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Hina Khan opens up about her battle with breast cancer

Indian actress reveals she has completed her first chemotherapy session and has resumed shooting

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Mumbai: Indian actress Hina Khan, known for her courageous fight against breast cancer, has shared her recent experiences with her fans and critics.

In a video posted on Instagram, the actress revealed that she has completed her first chemotherapy session and has resumed shooting.

Emphasizing the caption of her video, Hina wrote, “Continue working as usual during cancer treatment. This is my first job after the cancer diagnosis. Walking and talking are difficult, especially when facing the biggest challenge of your life,”.

The video received several negative comments, with users questioning the actress's decision to return to work despite her severe illness.

Hina Khan has now responded to the criticism through an Instagram story, where she shared her true condition.

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by 𝑯𝒊𝒏𝒂 𝑲𝒉𝒂𝒏 (@realhinakhan)

“I am in constant pain, yes, constant. Just because someone is smiling does not mean they are not in pain. If someone is not showing it, it does not mean they are fine,” Hina wrote.

The actress further added, “If someone says they are okay, they can still be suffering despite that,”.

Besides it, Hina shared a note sent to her by Mumbai's Kokilaben Hospital on her story.

The note read, “Dear Hina Khan, we know this surgery is extremely difficult for you, but we are happy to see you getting healthier,”.

She concluded by saying that “We hope you feel much better soon,”.

 

 

 

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Regional

Chinese Bridge summer camp for Pakistani students kicks off

The two-week program is designed to be a comprehensive experience, blending intensive language classes with cultural workshops, traditional Chinese art classes, and excursions to iconic historical sites across China, and providing participants with firsthand experiences of China’s heritage

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Beijing:  In an effort to further strengthen the friendship and cultural exchange between China and Pakistan, the 2024 “Chinese Bridge” Summer Camp for Pakistani students kicked off at the Jiangxi University of Science and Technology (JXUST) on 14 July in Ganzhou, China, marking the beginning of a two-week immersive experience for 20 Pakistani educators and students.

Representing institutions including the Punjab University (PU), Lahore University of Management Sciences (LUMS), Allama Iqbal Open University (AIOU), and the Aitchison College in Lahore, the participants gathered in Jiangxi to embark on a journey of language learning and cultural discovery.

The summer camp, a program under the auspices of the Confucius Institute Headquarters (Hanban) and supported by the Center for Language Education and Cooperation (CLEC) of the Ministry of Education, China, offers a unique opportunity for the Pakistani students and teachers to learn Mandarin Chinese, decipher the intricacies of Chinese characters, and delve deep into the rich tapestry of Chinese culture, Chinese media reported.

The two-week program is designed to be a comprehensive experience, blending intensive language classes with cultural workshops, traditional Chinese art classes, and excursions to iconic historical sites across China, and providing participants with firsthand experiences of China’s heritage.

Additionally, the camp facilitates a two-way cultural exchange: Participants will have the opportunity to immerse themselves in the daily life of the Chinese people and they are encouraged to share their own rich culture and heritage.

 

 

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World

Multiple Israeli strikes kill dozens near UN aid hub in Gaza as thousands flee fighting

Gazans also continued to face numerous evacuation orders from the Israeli military nine months into the conflict, which was sparked by Hamas-led attacks in multiple Israeli locations that left some 1,200 dead and more than 250 taken hostage

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New York: Multiple Israeli strikes have killed dozens of people in central Gaza, landing just 100 metres from a humanitarian hub, UN agencies said on Tuesday, as thousands continue to face displacement amid the ongoing war.

Reports of strikes landing near an aid centre in Deir Al-Balah came from the UN humanitarian office, OCHA, said UN Spokesperson Stephane Dujarric, who provided updates on the situation in the besieged enclave.

“The (aid) operations are continuing,” he told journalists at UN Headquarters. “But, if there’s a strike 100 metres away from the place where you work, it just adds to an already overwhelming level of stress for our colleagues not to mention the impact it has on civilians who are routinely killed in these strikes.”

Gazans also continued to face numerous evacuation orders from the Israeli military nine months into the conflict, which was sparked by Hamas-led attacks in multiple Israeli locations that left some 1,200 dead and more than 250 taken hostage.

Families joined the exodus from Gaza City to Deir Al-Balah, with more than 1,000 people crossing over the past week, mainly on donkey carts, motorcycles or by car, the UN Spokesperson said.

“Many of those people have told us that they have been displaced dozens of times,” Dujarric added.

As a result, UN teams have been deployed along the route to provide water, hot meals, food and health services to those fleeing Gaza City, he noted.

In terms of fuel needed to operate humanitarian services, he said shortages persist.

“The lack of fuel continues to hinder the work of basic service providers, including hospitals, ambulances, bakeries and aid trucks,” he said. “Over the past two weeks, we’ve been able to collect over 80,000 litres of fuel per day on average.”

While that’s an improvement from the previous daily average of 40,000 litres, Dujarric said it falls short of the 400,000 litres needed every day.

He said Israeli authorities are still not allowing the allocation of fuel to key local humanitarian responders, preventing them from transferring supplies within Gaza.

For its part, the UN took possession on Monday of 10 flatbed trucks to deliver aid, Dujarric said.

Despite enormous challenges, including shortages of medical supplies and medicines and the destruction of many clinics due to the war, the UN Agency for Palestine Refugees, UNRWA, continues to provide vital health services, working tirelessly to meet the growing health needs of the displaced.

For UN News, a media website, Ziad Taleb visited the agency’s clinic in Deir Al-Balah and met some of the displaced there, highlighting the immense suffering they are going through.

Amid the spread of infectious diseases and difficult living conditions, the UNRWA clinic remains a lifeline for many, providing free treatment and much-needed medical support.

Displaced people in the Gaza Strip are living in extremely difficult living conditions, Inas Hamdan, UNRWA’s public information director, said.

“Things are deteriorating dramatically with each passing day because this war has been going on for more than nine months,” she said. “The health situation is also very tragic because of the spread of diseases among the displaced, especially children.”

That includes skin diseases and viral hepatitis, in addition to gastrointestinal diseases and diarrhoea.

“There are a number of factors that led to this, the first of which is the lack of medical supplies and medicines needed to treat such cases,” she explained. “The most important thing is the living conditions that lack the most basic necessities of life inside tents or shelters. Most of these displaced people live in tents or shelters.”

Closed border crossings are making it increasingly difficult to bring in aid, including sufficient quantities of water alongside medical and hygiene supplies.

The majority of Gaza’s population of 2.3 million relies heavily on UNRWA clinics. Ashraf Abu Maghsib, a displaced person from eastern Deir Al-Balah, explained that he comes to UNRWA clinics because they provide free medicine, unlike pharmacies and other clinics that sell it at high prices.

Hiba Hassanein, who has been displaced from Beit Hanoun in northern Gaza, said “We chose the agency’s clinic because it provides free treatment to all citizens. We suffer from skin diseases, hepatitis and poor hygiene.”

Others echoed those concerns. Enas Othman, a displaced person from Jabalia in northern Gaza, said some of the most dangerous diseases are skin-related, pointing to the widespread presence of mosquitoes and the scarcity of potable water among displaced people. Indeed, the salty water causes many diseases, she added.

“We currently live in the Al Mawasi area in Khan Younis, which is a place full of insects that harm people and cause the spread of diseases,” she said.

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