Ancient stone found in France termed as oldest 3D map in Europe

Ancient stone found in France termed as oldest 3D map in Europe Ancient stone found in France termed as oldest 3D map in Europe

Paris: Archeologists have discovered an ancient stone which is now termed as the oldest three-dimensional map in Europe.

According to details, the freshly unearthed bronze-age stone is 2m by 1.5m large (5ft by 6.5ft), first uncovered in 1900, was found again in a cellar in a castle in France in 2014.

The slab, known as the Saint-Bélec Slab, is said to date from the early Bronze Age, between 1900 BC and 1650 BC.

Archeologists who are examining the markings engraved on the 4,000-year-old stone say they believe that the patterns over the slap are a map of an area in Western Brittany.

They have termed it as an oldest 3D map of a known area in Europe.

It was in 1900 that the slap was first discovered by local archaeologist Paul du Chatellier during a dig. Later it was forgotten for over a year and was found again by in a cellar in 2014.

After analyzing marks and engravings on the stone, the researchers say the indentations are a 3D representation of the River Odet valley, while several lines appear to illustrate the area's river network.

"This is probably the oldest map of a territory that has been identified," Dr Clément Nicolas from Bournemouth University, one of the study's authors, told the BBC.

 

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