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Samsung picks Texas for new $17 bn chip plant

Samsung is one of the world's largest chipmakers with more than 20,000 employees across the US.

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Samsung picks Texas for new $17 bn chip plant
GNN Media: Representational Photo

Seoul: The South Korean tech giant Samsung said on Wednesday that it has chosen a site close to the city of Taylor in Texas for its new $17bn (£12.7bn) computer chip plant, amid a global shortage of semiconductors.

It is electronics giant's biggest-ever US investment.

The plant is expected to create 2,000 technology industry jobs, with construction starting early next year.

Samsung, like several of its rivals, is racing to expand chip making in the US to tackle supply chain issues.

"With greater manufacturing capacity, we will be able to better serve the needs of our customers and contribute to the stability of the global semiconductor supply chain," Kinam Kim, chief executive of Samsung electronics device solutions said.

The plant is expected to be operational by the second half of 2024.

It comes as US President Joe Biden has been pushing chip giants to increase their production in the US.

White House officials said the new facility would help "protect our supply chains, revitalise our manufacturing base and create good jobs".

"Increasing domestic production of semiconductor chips is critical for our national and economic security," US Commerce Secretary Gina Raimondo said separately.

Chips made at the new facility will be used in a range of technologies including mobile, 5G, high-performance computing and artificial intelligence.

Samsung is one of the world's largest chipmakers with more than 20,000 employees across the US.

The company said that the latest announcement takes its total investment in the world's biggest economy to $47bn.

The global chip shortage has been causing major disruptions for manufacturers, from carmakers that have had to suspend production to Apple warning that iPhone shipments would be delayed.

In September, Intel broke ground on two plants in Arizona and is widely expected to announce the location for a planned manufacturing campus by the end of the year. Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. (TSMC) is building a plant in Arizona and is said to be considering building more in the US.

By building a new fabrication plant in the US, Samsung is doubling down on contract chip manufacturing.

Mehak Javed

Mehak Javed is immensely creative and an enthusiastic journalist, contributing in the publication of timely and accurate news. She is a skilled writer along proven history of achievement in the field with several years of professional experience. Mehak is working with GNN since 2020.

Pakistan

Nasla Tower demolition: Police baton-charge protesters

The protestors tried to enter the building to halt the demolition process

Published by Siddra Sumreen

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Nasla Tower demolition: Police baton-charge protesters

Karachi: Police have fired tear gas shells and baton-charged at protesters near the Nasla Tower shortly after authorities deployed a heavy contingent of anti-riot and anti-encroachment personnel at the building.

According to details, residents of the area stage protest against the demolition of the residential building located in Sindhi Muslim Society, recently declared illegal by the Supreme Court. 

The protestors tried to enter the building to halt the demolition process of the building. The police tried to stop the protestors and later restored to baton-charge and fired gas shells as the protestors kept on coming.

The deputy chairman ABAD and several other people got injured in the shelling.

The tear gas also affected houses in the locality and hampered road traffic on the Sharae Faisal.

The protest came after the Supreme Court (SC) gave a one-week deadline to demolish the Nasla Tower. Chief Justice of Pakistan (CJP) Justice Gulzar Ahmed took up the case at the SC Karachi registry. During the hearing, the court was informed by the Karachi commissioner that 200 people are working on demolishing the tower.

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Health

'Variant of concern': WHO names new Covid variant as Omicron

The World Health Organisation (WHO) on Friday classified the B.1.1.529 variant detected in South Africa as a SARS-CoV-2 "variant of concern," saying it may spread more quickly than other forms.

Published by Faisal Ali Ghumman

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'Variant of concern': WHO names new Covid variant as Omicron

Preliminary evidence suggested there is an increased risk of reinfection and there had been a "detrimental change in COVID-19 epidemiology," it said in a statement after a closed meeting of independent experts who reviewed the data.

Infections in South Africa had risen steeply in recent weeks, coinciding with detection of the variant now designated as omicron, WHO said.

"This variant has a large number of mutations, some of which are concerning. Preliminary evidence suggests an increased risk of reinfection with this variant, as compared to other (variants of concern), it said.

Omicron is the fifth variant to carry such a designation.
"This variant has been detected at faster rates than previous surges in infection, suggesting that this variant may have a growth advantage," the WHO said.

Current PCR tests continue to successfully detect the variant, it said.

Earlier, the WHO cautioned countries against hastily imposing travel restrictions linked to the variant of COVID-19, saying they should take a "risk-based and scientific approach".

Global authorities reacted with alarm to the new variant detected in South Africa, with the EU and Britain among those tightening border controls as scientists sought to find out if the mutation was vaccine-resistant. L1N2SH089

"At this point, implementing travel measures is being cautioned against," WHO spokesman Christian Lindmeier told a U.N. briefing in Geneva. "The WHO recommends that countries continue to apply a risk-based and scientific approach when implementing travel measures."

It would take several weeks to determine the variant's transmissibility and the effectiveness of vaccines and therapeutics against it, he said, noting that 100 sequences of the variant have been reported so far.

People should continue to wear masks whenever possible, avoid large gatherings, ventilate rooms and maintain hand hygiene, Lindmeier added.

Mike Ryan, WHO's emergency director, praised South African public health institutions for picking up the signal of the new variant.

But he warned that while some countries had systems in place to do this, the situation elsewhere was often unclear.

"So it's really important that there are no knee-jerk responses here. Especially with relation to South Africa," he said. "Because we've seen in the past, the minute that there is any mention of any kind of variation, then everyone is closing borders and restricting travel."

SOURCE: REUTERS

 

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Regional

2 killed in Lahore road accident

Mishap took place when a speeding vehicle rammed into the people standing on the sidewalk

Published by Siddra Sumreen

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2 killed in Lahore road accident

Lahore: Two young men were killed in a traffic accident in Defense area of Lahore on Saturday morning.

According to GNN, the accident took place in Defence’s Phase VI where the car hit the footpath and turned over resulting in two deaths and injuries to another man.

Those died on the spot were identified as 24-year-old Faisal and 25-year-old Ali Ahmad

According to the traffic police, another young person named Amir was also injured in the accident and was shifted to General Hospital for medical treatment.

Earlier on yesterday, at least three students have lost their lives in an accident in Bahawalpur.

According to details, the mishap took place when a speeding trailer rammed into the students in Musafir Khana area.

Receiving information about the incident, rescue teams and security personnel arrived at the scene and shifted the victims to the nearby hospital. 

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