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Int'l Day for Elimination of Violence against Women being observed 

This year the theme is "Orange the World: End Violence Against Women Now!”

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Int'l Day for Elimination of Violence against Women being observed 
GNN Media: Representational Photo

International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women is being observed today (November 25) with a goal to increase awareness of the suffering of women worldwide.

This year the theme is "Orange the World: End Violence Against Women Now!”

Orange colour symbolises a more hopeful future for a free of violence society for women and girls.

The major goal of the day is to raise public awareness of the problem and to improve legislation and resources committed to eradicating violence against women across the world.

This day is marked to prevent as well as respond to violence against women and to apprise people about the basic human rights of women and gender equality.

As per a United Nations (UN) report, it is estimated that throughout their life, 1 out of every 3 women experiences physical abuse or sexual violence from their intimate relationship or from a non-partner.

Each day, 137 women are killed or murdered by some of their family members, said UN.

History and Significance 

The Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) was established by the United Nations General Assembly in the year 1979.

In this regard, the UN General Assembly passed Resolution 48/104 by adopting the "Declaration on the Elimination of Violence against Women" on 20 December 1993, laying the groundwork for a society free of gender-based violence.

Women's rights activists, then, recognised 25 November as the day to fight against gender-based violence since 1981.

The date was chosen to respect the Mirabai sisters, the three Dominican Republic political activists -- who were brutally killed in 1960 on the orders of the nation's ruler, Rafael Trujillo.  

The significance of this day is that it also aims to take action globally to close financing shortfalls and secure crucial services for survivors of violence.

 

Mehak Javed

Mehak Javed is immensely creative and an enthusiastic journalist, contributing in the publication of timely and accurate news. She is a skilled writer along proven history of achievement in the field with several years of professional experience. Mehak is working with GNN since 2020.

Pakistan

Pakistan has offered to host OIC moot to discuss Afghan crisis: minister

The meeting has been called to discuss the situation in Afghanistan and pathways for an urgent humanitarian response.

Published by Faisal Ali Ghumman

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Pakistan has offered to host OIC moot to discuss Afghan crisis: minister

Islamabad: Welcoming  Saudi Arabia's move to request an extraordinary session of the Organisation of Islamic Cooperation's (OIC) Council of Foreign Ministers to discuss the situation in Afghanistan, Foreign Minister Shah Mahmood Qureshi welcomed on Monday announced that Pakistan had offered to host the meeting in Islamabad on December 17.

According to a statement issued by the Foreign Office (FO), Qureshi said Pakistan "fully endorses" the initiative taken by Saudi Arabia and expressed confidence that other OIC members would also back the proposal.

Saudi Arabia, which is the chair of the OIC summit, made the call for the extraordinary session the same day, according to state-run Saudi Press Agency.

The agency reported that the meeting had been called to discuss the situation in Afghanistan and "pathways for an urgent humanitarian response", acknowledging Pakistan's offer to host the summit.

Since the Taliban took over Afghanistan on August 15, the country — already struggling with drought and severe poverty after decades of war — has seen its economy all but collapse, raising the spectre of an exodus of refugees.

According to the FO's statement, Qureshi, too, highlighted the need for providing humanitarian assistance to the people of Afghanistan in these difficult times.

"Afghanistan is a founding member of the OIC. As part of the Islamic Ummah, we are bound by fraternal bonds of amity and brotherhood with the people of Afghanistan," he said, stressing that "today, our Afghan brothers and sisters need us more than ever before."

Describing the situation in the warn-torn country, he said Afghanistan currently "faces a serious humanitarian situation — millions of Afghans, including women and children, confront an uncertain future due to [the] shortage of food, medicines, and other essential life supplies".

And the advent of winter had exacerbated this humanitarian crisis, the foreign minister added.​He emphasised the need for the OIC to "step in to help our Afghan brethren".

"We should step up our collective efforts to alleviate the humanitarian needs of the Afghan people, provide immediate and sustained support to them, and continue to remain engaged with them for the wellbeing and prosperity of Afghanistan."

According to the FO, the first extraordinary session of the OIC Council of Foreign Ministers was held in Islamabad in January 1980, also on the then situation in Afghanistan.

"Next month, we would, once again, gather in Islamabad, to reaffirm our abiding solidarity with and support to the Afghan people," it quoted Qureshi as saying.

The foreign minister added that he was confident about the meeting considering "concrete steps to help address the humanitarian and economic challenges facing Afghanistan," and that he looked forward to welcoming his fellow foreign ministers from OIC member states to Islamabad.

 

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World

Kabul roadside blast causes casualties: Report

As per preliminary detail, the target of the attack appeared to have been an open-backed vehicle like a Toyota Hilux.

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Kabul roadside blast causes casualties: Report

Kabul: A roadside bomb blast in Afghanistan capital Kabul caused at least five casualties, television station Ariana News said on Tuesday.

As per preliminary detail, the target of the attack appeared to have been an open-backed vehicle like a Toyota Hilux.

However, there were no further details and no official confirmation of the figures.

More to follow…

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Sweden's first female PM Magdalena Andersson reappointed days after quitting

Sweden's first female prime minister Magdalena Andersson was reappointed on Monday days after she quit amid political turmoil and jostling ahead of elections.

Published by Faisal Ali Ghumman

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Sweden's first female PM Magdalena Andersson reappointed days after quitting

Lawmakers narrowly elected her premier for the second time in less than a week after she set out plans for a minority government made up of only her Social Democrats.

The former finance minister had won a similar vote on Wednesday but threw in the towel hours later after a junior coalition partner left the government over a lost budget vote. read more

"Like all minority governments, we will seek co-operation with other parties in parliament, and I see good opportunities to do so," Andersson, whose party holds 100 seats in the 349-seat parliament, told a news conference.

"The Social Democrats have the biggest party group in parliament by a wide margin. We also have a long tradition of cooperation with others and stand ready to do what is needed to lead Sweden forward."

The leader of the right-wing opposition Moderate Party, Ulf Kristersson, described the incoming administration as a "nine-month caretaker government" and said it would not be able to achieve much in the run-up to elections due in September 2022.

Andersson will have to lead one of Sweden's weakest governments in recent decades, and govern on a budget in part formulated by three opposition parties, including the anti-immigration Sweden Democrats, whose gains over the past decade lie at heart of Sweden's political turmoil.

Parliament adopted budget amendments put forward by the opposition last week which heavily reshaped government spending plans.

The Social Democrats have been in power since 2014 supported by parties united by little else than their desire to keep the Sweden Democrats from influencing policy.

The centre-right opposition has struggled to gather enough votes to form a majority government and polls suggest there may be little shift in the political calculus in the next election.

Andersson will face major challenges.

Gang violence plagues the suburbs of major cities. The health service barely coped with the pandemic and needs strengthening, while the government will need to manage a promised transition to a zero-emissions economy.

SOURCE: REUTERS

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