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Money laundering case: FIA demands arrest of PM Shahbaz, CM Hamza

Counsel of the PML-N leaders opposed FIA plea

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Money laundering case: FIA demands arrest of PM Shahbaz, CM Hamza
GNN Media: Representational Photo

Lahore: The Federal Investigation Agency (FIA) has demanded the arrest of Prime Minister Shahbaz Sharif and Chief Minister Hamza Shahbaz in the Rs16 billion money laundering case.

According to details, Prime Minister Shehbaz Sharif and his son and CM Punjab Hamza Shehbaz appeared before the special court in Lahore under strict security protocol.

The CM Punjab's lawyer Amjad Pervez concluded the arguments regarding the interim bail of the PM and CM Punjab while FIA pleaded to the court to order their arrest.

During the hearing, the court inquired whether the FIA ​​says they need the arrest of the accused, to which the FIA ​​prosecutor said that the further role of the accused has yet to be proved. The arrest of the accused is required.

Counsel of the PML-N leaders opposed FIA plea and argued the Pakistan Tehreek-e-Insaf (PTI) led government had filed the case with mala fide intent to target political opponents.

FIA has also submitted a supplementary challan against PM Shehbaz and CM Hamza and others in money laundering case.

In December last year, the FIA had submitted a challan against the two PML-N leaders before the court for their alleged involvement in laundering an amount of Rs16 billion in the sugar scam case. The investigation team has “detected 28 Benami [untitled] accounts of the Shehbaz family through which money laundering of Rs16.3bn was committed during 2008 to 2018”. It examined the money trail of 17,000 credit transactions.

World

Flooding caused by heavy rain kills 16 in western China

Rivers changed courses and flooded villages and towns. More than 6,200 people were affected by the flood.

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Flooding caused by heavy rain kills 16 in western China

Beijing: Flooding caused by heavy rainfall in the western Chinese province of Qinghai has killed 16 people, state media reported on Thursday, with an additional 36 missing.

Heavy and sudden downpours in Datong Hui and Tu Autonomous County, population 403,368, of Qinghai province started late Wednesday, causing flooding on the mountains and triggered landslides, according to China's state broadcaster CCTV.

Rivers changed courses and flooded villages and towns. More than 6,200 people were affected by the flood.

Local government has sent a rescue team of 2,000 people and more than 160 vehicles for disaster relief.

Since June, China has been grappling with extreme weather from heatwaves to historic floods. The government has blamed climate change, which it says will increasingly affect the economy and society. 

SOURCE: Reuters

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Pakistan

US Secretary of State extends full support to Pakistan’s flood victims

"We continue to work together to mitigate future impacts of the climate crisis in Pakistan"

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US Secretary of State extends full support to Pakistan’s flood victims

Washington: US Secretary of State Antony Blinken has reiterated the commitment to stand by Pakistan in hard times and extends full support to flood victims.

In a tweet, he said one million dollars will be given to Pakistan to build resilience against natural disasters. He said this amount is in addition to one hundred thousand dollars in immediate relief.

The US Secretary of State said we continue to work together to mitigate future impacts of the climate crisis in Pakistan.

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Japan urges young adults to drink more alcohol

Japan's young adults are a sober bunch - something authorities are hoping to change with a new campaign.

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Japan urges young adults to drink more alcohol

Japan's young adults are a sober bunch - something authorities are hoping to change with a new campaign.

The younger generation drinks less alcohol than their parents - a move that has hit taxes from beverages like sake (rice wine). 

So the national tax agency has stepped in with a national competition to come up with ideas to reverse the trend.

The "Sake Viva!" campaign hopes to come up with a plan to make drinking more attractive - and boost the industry.

The contest asks 20 to 39-year-olds to share their business ideas to kick-start demand among their peers - whether it's for Japanese sake, shochu, whiskey, beer or wine.

The group running the competition for the tax authority says new habits - partly formed during the Covid pandemic - and an ageing population have led to a decline in alcohol sales.

It wants contestants to come up with promotions, branding, and even cutting-edge plans involving artificial intelligence.

Japanese media say the reaction has been mixed, with some criticism about the bid to promote an unhealthy habit. But others have posted quirky ideas online - such as famous actresses "performing" as virtual-reality hostesses in digital clubs.

Contestants have until the end of September to put forward their ideas. The best plans will then be developed with help from experts before the final proposals are presented in November.

The campaign's website says Japan's alcohol market is shrinking and the country's older demographic - alongside declining birth rates - is a significant factor behind it.

Recent figures from the tax agency show that people were drinking less in 2020 than in 1995, with numbers plummeting from 100 litres (22 gallons) a year to 75 litres (16 gallons).

Tax revenue from taxes on alcohol has also shrunk over the years. According to The Japan Times newspaper, it made up 5% of total revenue in 1980, but in 2020 amounts to just 1.7%.

The World Bank estimates that nearly a third (29%) of Japan's population is aged 65 and older - the highest proportion in the world.

Concerns about the future of sake is not the only problem that poses for Japan's economy - there are worries about the supply of younger staff for certain types of jobs, and care for the elderly in the future.

SOURCE: BBC

 

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