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Pakistan

Imran Khan's hands are in the pockets of others: Muhammad Zubair

According to sources, the former Sindh governor said that peace came to Karachi due to the steps taken by PML-N.

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Imran Khan's hands are in the pockets of others: Muhammad Zubair
GNN Media: Representational Photo

KARACHI: Pakistan Muslim League-Nawaz (PML-N) leader Muhammad Zubair has said that Imran Khan does not need to do anything on his own. Imran Khan has put on the cloak of honesty; if Prime Minister (PM) is not corrupt then he should tell the details of the gifts.

According to sources, the former Sindh governor said that peace came to Karachi due to the steps taken by PML-N.

The PML-N leader said that two LNG terminals are working in the country, we had installed two LNG terminals. They have ordered only 40 buses in three years, if we weren’t defeated by force if we had brought 180 buses.

He said that PML-N started the project of Lyari Expressway, completed two power projects at Port Qasim, installed a nuclear power plant, built two LNG terminals, we completed 80% of the green line project.

He said that it has been three years but Karachi has not received a single rupee from the federation. In our time, the chairman of the Board of Investment was appointed from Karachi.

He further said that PTI is putting its plaques on our projects in Punjab too. We had built Lahore Metro in 11 months. PML-N has made historic projects. At present, there is no chairman of the Board of Investors.

Meesam Javaid

Meesam Javaid is a senior editor at GNN, known for writing top quality content which garner very high readerships and has been covering every field of journalism, including politics, media, sports and scholarly articles. Meesam Javaid is nothing less than a Veteran Editor and has been writing for GNN for the past 8 months.

World

Japan to reopen to foreign tourists after two-year pandemic closure

Japan will allow the entry of people on tours with fixed schedules

Published by Siddra Sumreen

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Japan to reopen to foreign tourists after two-year pandemic closure

Tokyo: Japan will open its borders to foreign tourists in June for the first time since imposing tight pandemic travel restrictions about two years ago, but only for package tours for now.

Beginning June 10, Japan will allow the entry of people on tours with fixed schedules and guides, Prime Minister Fumio Kishida said.

Japanese government has announced it will end a two-year pandemic closure and reopen to tourists from 98 countries and regions – including Britain, the US, France, Spain, Canada and Malaysia – next month, but travelers will only be allowed in as part of the tour groups.

The decision comes after the government last week said it would test allowing small group tours with visitors from the US, Australia, Thailand and Singapore from this month.

Japan will also expand the number of airports that accept international flights to seven, adding Naha in its southern Okinawa prefecture and New Chitose near Sapporo in northern Hokkaido.

For most of the pandemic Japan has barred all tourists and allowed only citizens and foreign residents entry, though even the latter have periodically been shut out.

All arrivals have to test negative for Covid before traveling to Japan and many must be tested again on arrival, though triple-vaccinated people coming from certain countries can skip the additional test as well as a three-day quarantine required for others.

Tour groups are expected to take responsibility for ensuring visitors respect Japan’s near-universal mask-wearing and other measures that have helped keep the toll from Covid comparatively low.

Just how many people will be able to take advantage of the careful reopening is unclear as Japan is planning to double a daily entry cap, but only to 20,000.

The Prime Minister, Fumio Kishida, has said he wants to ease border control measures, but moves are expected to proceed slowly, with strong public support for the current restrictions.

Japan welcomed a record 31.9 million foreign visitors in 2019 and had been on track to achieve its goal of 40 million in 2020 before the pandemic hit.

SOURCE: AFP

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Regional

Forest fire video case: TikToker 'in a fix' as court rejects pre-arrest bail application

Nosheen Saeed alias Dolly had posted a clip of herself walking playfully in a silver ball gown in front of a burning hillside

Published by Faisal Ali Ghumman

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Forest fire video case: TikToker 'in a fix' as court rejects pre-arrest bail application

Islamabad: A district and sessions court in Islamabad on Friday rejected the pre-arrest bail application of TikToker Nosheen Saeed alias Dolly in a case related to a forest fire in Margalla Hills.

Dolly, who has more than 11 million followers on TikTok, had posted a clip of herself walking playfully in a silver ball gown in front of a burning hillside, presumably the Margalla Hills in Islamabad, with the caption: "Fire erupts wherever I am."

Her video immediately came under fire on social media as people initially assumed that she had started the blaze herself at a time when a devastating heatwave was underway in Pakistan causing forest fires.

Subsequently, within hours after it was uploaded, the video was taken down from the application.

Later, the TikToker said in a clarification released by an assistant that she did not start the fire and there was "no harm in making videos".

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Health

WHO says monkeypox can be contained if we act now

there are about 300 confirmed or suspected cases in around 20 countries

Published by Faisal Ali Ghumman

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WHO says monkeypox can be contained if we act now

Countries should take quick steps to contain the spread of monkeypox and share data about their vaccine stockpiles, a senior World Health Organization official said on Friday.

"We think that if we put in place the right measures now we probably can contain this easily," Sylvie Briand, WHO director for Global Infectious Hazard Preparedness, told the U.N. agency's annual assembly.

Monkeypox is a usually mild viral infection that is endemic in parts of west and central Africa.

It spreads chiefly through close contact and until the recent outbreak, was rarely seen in other parts of the world, which is why the recent emergence of cases in Europe, the United States and other areas has raised alarms.

So far, there are about 300 confirmed or suspected cases in around 20 countries where the virus was not previously circulating. 

"For us, we think that the key priority currently is trying to contain this transmission in non-endemic countries," Briand told a technical briefing for member states.

Needed measures included the early detection and isolation of cases and contact tracing, she added.

Member states should also share information about first generation stockpiles of smallpox vaccines which can also be effective against monkeypox, Briand said. read more

"We don't know exactly the number of doses available in the world and so that’s why we encourage countries to come to WHO and tell us what are their stockpiles," she said. A slide of her presentation described global supplies as "very constrained".

Currently, WHO officials are advising against mass vaccination, instead suggesting targeted vaccination where available for close contacts of people infected.

"Case investigation, contact tracing, isolation at home will be your best bets," said Rosamund Lewis, WHO head of the smallpox secretariat which is part of the WHO Emergencies Programme.

SOURCE: REUTERS

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