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Rupee depreciated by 10 paisa against US dollar

The Japanese yen gained 02 paisa and closed at Rs1.80, whereas a decrease of 82 paisa was witnessed in the exchange rate of the British Pound, which traded at Rs358.81 as compared to the last day’s closing of Rs359.63

Published by Hussnain Bhutta

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Islamabad: Pakistani rupee on Wednesday depreciated by 10 paisa against the US dollar in the interbank trading and closed at Rs 278.50 against the previous day’s closing of Rs 278.40.

However, according to the Forex Association of Pakistan (FAP), the buying and selling rates of the dollar in the open market stood at Rs 279 and Rs 280.75 respectively.

The price of Euro came down by Rs 1.24 paisa to close at Rs 301.55 against the last day’s closing of Rs 302.79, according to the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP).

The Japanese yen gained 02 paisa and closed at Rs1.80, whereas a decrease of 82 paisa was witnessed in the exchange rate of the British Pound, which traded at Rs358.81 as compared to the last day’s closing of Rs359.63.

The exchange rate of the Emirates Dirham and the Saudi Riyal increased by 02 paisa each to close at Rs75.82 and Rs74.24 respectively.

 

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Regional

Rana Sanaullah lauds UNESCO's role in sports education

The Prime Minister's Advisor on Inter Provincial Coordination calls for supporting international efforts focused on sports for peace and development and building a bright future for coming generations

Published by Hussnain Bhutta

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Islamabad: Prime Minister's Advisor on Inter Provincial Coordination Rana Sanaullah Khan on Wednesday called for supporting international efforts focused on sports for peace and development and building a bright future for coming generations.

He said this during his visit to UNESCO headquarters in Paris on Wednesday, while attending the opening ceremony of the Paris 2024 Olympics and represented Pakistan at the ´Change the Game' Ministerial Forum.

The Advisor also participated in the discussion focused on 'Leveraging Quality Physical Education and Sport for Sustainable Social Legacies.'

He appreciated UNESCO for organizing this high-level forum in the run-up to the 2024 Paris Olympic Games.

Rana Sanaullah said the mega sports events, like Olympics, act as a unifying force in bringing together the entire world in healthy competition - where all of us are winners.

He said physical education and sports provide productive pathways for individuals as well as societies to build resilience and skills, such as leadership, communication, team-building, and critical thinking.  He acknowledged that sports also teach discipline, develop friendship across borders and play a positive role in promoting mutual understanding, celebrating cultural diversity, and enhancing physical and mental health of youth.

The Advisor said UNESCO has a central role to play in this field and can assist Member States through its capacity building programs on physical education and sports.

 

 

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World

Vultures' near extinction led to 500,000 deaths in India

Millions of vultures have been unintentionally poisoned by diclofenac

Published by Samiullah Farid

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Chicago: A new study has found that the near extinction of vultures in India led to the deaths of about 500,000 people over five years. 

A study published in American Economic Review, titled: “The Social Costs of Keystone Species Collapse: Evidence From The Decline of Vultures in India”, states tens of millions of vultures were unintentionally poisoned by diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory drug used for cattle. This caused a collapse in their population, removing "nature’s sanitation service" and allowing deadly bacteria and infections to spread.

Vultures play a critical role in their habitat by scavenging and removing rotting livestock, which helps prevent disease. Farmers have long relied on them for this essential sanitation role.

The collapse of vulture populations in the mid-1990s had severe impacts on human health. The study, which will be published in the American Economic Review, details how their absence led to 100,000 additional deaths annually.

“Vultures are considered nature’s sanitation service because of the important role they play in removing dead animals that contain bacteria and pathogens from our environment—without them, disease can spread,” says study co-author Eyal Frank, an EPIC scholar and assistant professor at the Harris School of Public Policy.

“Understanding the role vultures play in human health underscores the importance of protecting wildlife, and not just the cute and cuddly. They all have a job to do in our ecosystems that impacts our lives.”

Researchers Eyal Frank and Anant Sudarshan from Warwick University compared human death rates in Indian districts that once had thriving vulture populations to areas with historically low vulture populations before and after the vulture collapse.

They found that just after the anti-inflammatory drug sales rose and vulture populations collapsed, the human death rate increased by more than 4 percent in districts where the birds once thrived. The effect was greatest in urban areas with large livestock populations, where carcass dumps occur on the outskirts of towns. The authors estimated that between 2000 and 2005, the loss of vultures caused about 100,000 additional human deaths each year, resulting in $69.4 billion per year in mortality damages.

The increase in deaths was due to the spread of disease and bacteria that vultures would have ordinarily removed. Without them, the dog population increased and brought rabies to humans. The sale of rabies vaccines increased during this time but was not enough. Because dogs were not as effective as vultures at cleaning rotting remains, bacteria and pathogens spread to drinking water through runoff and poor disposal methods. Fecal bacteria in the water more than doubled.

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