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PM Imran Khan launches first-ever National Security Policy

National Security policy articulates a citizen-centric framework, placing economic security at its core and seeking a secure and economically resilient Pakistan

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PM Imran Khan launches first-ever National Security Policy
GNN Media: Representational Photo

Islamabad: Prime Minister Imran Khan on Friday has signed the public version of the first-ever citizen-centric National Security Policy of Pakistan for the years 2022-2026.

Addressing the ceremony, the premier said that the previous governments had failed to strengthen the country’s economy. National security has been clearly explained in the new policy, he added.

PM Imran said that the government approached International Monetary Fund (IMF) due to deteriorating condition of the country.

The prime minister said, “Inclusive growth means not only to uplift the poor people but also the neglected areas… (In such case) every common man becomes a stakeholder to protect the state… The biggest security is when people stand behind state for its protection”.

The prime minister, who earlier signed the historic document, appreciated the National Security Division for formulating a policy based on the consensus of the whole state and defining the national security in a “right manner”.

First of its kind in Pakistan’s history, the National Security policy articulates a citizen-centric framework, placing economic security at its core and seeking a secure and economically resilient Pakistan. The formulation process of the policy includes multiple consultations with official stakeholders and input from over 600 individuals, including national security experts.

The prime minister said the NSP would also help correct the dimension and help the whole government machinery to move in one direction for achieving national security and stability.

Federal ministers, Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff Committee, all services chiefs, diplomats, senior civil and military officers attended the launching ceremony.

The prime minister emphasized that our armed forces were our pride and glued the nation together. Given the threats we face in the region, and the growing threat of hybrid warfare, they would continue to receive even greater support and importance.

The prime minister explained the significance of his government’s successful initiative of producing the National Security Policy calling it a major priority of his government.

He also highlighted the importance of the policy’s successful implementation and announced that the National Security Committee (NSC) will regularly review progress.

He said the NSP centered on the government’s vision, which believes that the security of Pakistan rested in the security of its citizens.

Any national security approach must prioritize national cohesion and the prosperity of people, while guaranteeing fundamental rights and social justice without discrimination, he added.

The prime minister said in order to achieve the vast potential of the citizens, it was necessary to promote delivery-based good governance.

Prime Minister explained that the foremost aim of the foreign policy and military capability would remain peace and stability in the region and beyond.

Our foreign policy will also focus much more on economic diplomacy going forward, he remarked.

National Security Adviser Dr Moeed Yusuf, in his remarks, briefly explained the National Security Policy vision and thanked the Prime Minister and all officials for their constant support.

He said that the National Security Policy has taken a broad view of national security as both traditional and non-traditional issues impacted the country’s security.

While the National Security Policy is centered around economic security, the geo-strategic and geo-political imperatives also feature prominently to strengthen Pakistan security and standing in the world, he remarked.

He highlighted that this was a document finalized after full civil-military consensus.

Siddra Sumreen

Syeda Siddra has been working as a web journalist for over the past seven years. She earned her M.Phil degree in Mass Communication from the Lahore Leads University. Ms. Siddra has previously worked with other renowned channels and is now associated with GNN as Senior Content Writer.

Regional

Two colleges closed in Islamabad amid rising coronavirus cases

Six cases of COVID-19 have been reported in two colleges of Islamabad

Published by Faisal Waqas

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Two colleges closed in Islamabad amid rising coronavirus cases

Islamabad: Islamabad administration has closed two colleges after emerging coronavirus cases on Sunday. 

According to the details garnered, positive cases of COVID-19 have been reported in two colleges of the federal capital. In this regard, the Islamabad district health officer (DHO) has informed the Deputy Commissioner in a letter.

In the letter to the deputy commissioner (DC), the DHO informed that six cases of COVID-19 have been reported in two colleges. The DHO said that three Corona cases have been reported in IMCG G-6/1, while three Corona cases have also come to light in IMCG F-6/2. 

Following to the coronavirus cases, the district health officer directed to close the two colleges immediately till the next order and spray disinfectant.

The letter said that the federal administration should conduct contact tracing and testing in both the colleges, while the tests should also be conducted of close relatives to the infected female students.

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Pakistan

COVID-19: Pakistan logs 4,340 new infections, seven deaths 

Pakistan’s COVID positivity rate now stands at 8.71%.

Published by Mehak Javed

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COVID-19: Pakistan logs 4,340 new infections, seven deaths 

Islamabad: Pakistan has witnessed an enormous spike in its daily tally of coronavirus disease (Covid-19) after as many as 4,340 new infections were logged in the last 24 hours, according to morning update by ministry of health.

Pakistan’s COVID positivity rate now stands at 8.71%. While, the cumulative tally of the country has now climbed to 1,328,487. 

As the fifth wave of COVID-19 intensifies in Pakistan reported 4,027 new coronavirus infections, a new daily record, with authorities linking the spike with the Omicron variant of virus.  

According to the latest figures issued by the National Command and Operation Center (NCOC), 4,340 persons were tested positive while 7 died in the past 24 hours— taking Pakistan's COVID death toll to 29,019.   

As many as 1,263,791 patients have recovered from the disease. 

Punjab

The number of patients swelled to 453,392 in the province with 13,088 causalities.

Sindh

The number of infections has surged to 502,500 in the province, while the death toll has reached 7,694.

Khyber Pakhtunkhwa

The confirmed cases have surged to 182,311 in the province with 5,958 casualties.

Balochistan

There are 33,705 confirmed cases while 367 patients have died from the infection so far.

AJK and Gilgit-Baltistan

There are 34,758 coronavirus cases in the AJK while the death toll has reached 749. On the other hand, there are 10,445 cases in GB with 187 coronavirus deaths.

Islamabad

There are 111,376 cases in the capital city while 969 people have lost their lives.  

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World

Mali ex-president Keita dies two years after coup ouster

Mali’s interim government issued a statement hailing the memory of the illustrious Keita

Published by Faisal Waqas

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Mali ex-president Keita dies two years after coup ouster

Bamako: Mali’s former president Ibrahim Boubacar Keita, who led the West African country from 2013 until he was ousted in a coup in 2020, died at the age of 76 in the capital Bamako on Sunday, his family said.

Looming over most of Keita’s presidency was the militant insurgency that has rocked the poor Sahel country since 2012, while his toppling marked the rise of the military junta which is now under regional sanctions for failing to restore civilian rule.

Mali’s interim government issued a statement hailing “the memory of the illustrious” Keita, adding that the former president died “after a long illness”.

Keita was forced out of office on August 18, 2020, by young military officers who staged an uprising at a base near Bamako before heading into the city, where they seized Keita and other leaders.

Foreign Minister Abdoulaye Diop said he was “saddened to learn of the death of former President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita”, adding that “it is with great emotion that I bow before his memory”.

Macky Sall, president of neighbouring Senegal, said in a Tweet he was “saddened” by the news, while Niger’s ex-president Mahamadou Issoufou, a former comrade of Keita’s in the Socialist International, hailed him as “a cultured man, a great patriot and a pan-Africanist”.

Politicians and other public figures went to Keita’s home southwest of Bamako to offer their condolences, with police guarding the entrances, according to AFP journalists at the scene.

The government statement said funeral plans would be announced at a later date.

– Protests, coups –

In the weeks before the 2020 coup, Keita had been struggling with protests fuelled by his handling of the jihadist insurgency and failure to turn around Mali’s floundering economy.

Snail-paced political reforms, decrepit public services and schools, and a widely shared perception of government corruption also fed anti-Keita sentiment, driving tens of thousands of protesters into the streets.

Seized by the putschists, the junta that emerged from the rebellion — under pressure from the West African bloc ECOWAS — released Keita weeks later and returned him to his residence in Bamako, under surveillance.

He suffered a mini-stroke the following month and was sent to the United Arab Emirates for treatment. He had been based at his Bamako home since staying out of public life.

The ruling junta would stage another coup in May 2021, toppling a civilian transitional government.

The junta had vowed to hold elections next month to transition the country back to civilian rule. But at the end of the last year, the junta revised its timetable, saying it could stay in power for up to five years.

In response, ECOWAS agreed to sanction Mali earlier this month, imposing a trade embargo and shutting borders, in a decision backed by the United States, the European Union and former colonial power France.

Landlocked Mali, one of the world’s poorest countries, is already feeling the effects of the sanctions, prompting thousands to protest in Bamako on Friday.

– Political veteran –

The son of a civil servant, Keita was born in the southern industrial city of Koutiala, the declining heartland of cotton production.

After studying literature in Mali, Senegal and France, Keita became an adviser for the EU’s overseas development fund before heading a development project in northern Mali.

He then rose through the ranks under Alpha Oumar Konare, the country’s first democratically elected president.

As a socialist prime minister between 1994 and 2000, he quelled a series of crippling strikes, earning a reputation as a firm leader and helping to set up his landslide election in 2013.

Keita was then re-elected in the 2018 elections, beating opposition leader Soumaila Cisse, who died in December 2020 of Covid.

Cisse’s kidnapping by jihadists in March 2020 further illustrated Keita’s inability to stop the violence, with rising public outrage culminating in the coup months later.

Source: AFP

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